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02-Feb-2016 20:07

CID warns that these fake soldiers' promises of love and devotion only “end up breaking hearts and bank accounts.”According to CID, the pretend heroes sink so low as to be using the names, ranks and even pictures of actual U. soldiers - some killed in action -- to target women 30 to 55 years old on social media and dating web sites.Victims who who get worried and ask to actually talk to the fake soldiers are typically told the Army does not allow them to make phone calls or that they need money to "help keep the Army internet running." Another common thread, according to Grey is for the "soldier" to claim to be a widower raising a child or children on their own. Army Criminal Investigation Command recommends: Never Send Money - "Be extremely suspicious if you are asked for money for transportation costs, communication fees or marriage processing and medical fees."In addition, be very suspicious if the person you are corresponding with wants you to mail anything to an African country.Melanie Daria, one of Trustify’s private investigators, first saw Peter’s profile when it was sent to her by Phoebe, a client.Phoebe was already in the midst of starting a relationship with the man, and since she’d worked with Melanie before, she thought she’d simply run the man’s information past her and get the all clear. She’d had rough experiences, and she was hoping that things finally were working out for her - at least in the romance department”. “Peter’s profile had none of the usual indicators that it was genuine.

Když na tomto webu na něco kliknete, vyjádříte tím svůj souhlas, že smíme cookies na Facebooku i mimo něj používat.These days, they look everything like the real thing.When Phoebe was approached by a soldier based in Afghanistan, she had no idea that she was about to fall victim to one of the most common - and underhanded - dating scams around.Last year, the BBC reported that a rising number of scammers, often based in West Africa, were pretending to be US soldiers in order to solicit money from women they met on dating sites.

Some of these men used the names of real American soldiers, and would take photos from military websites to use as their profile pictures on the dating sites. "It is heartbreaking to hear these stories over and again of people who have sent thousands of dollars to someone they have never met and sometimes have never even spoken to on the phone."According to Grey, the scams typically employ clever, romantically worded requests for money to help the fake “deployed soldier” buy special laptop computers, international telephones, military leave applications, and transportation fees needed to keep the budding “relationship” going."We've even seen instances where the perpetrators are asking the victims for money to 'purchase leave papers' from the Army, help pay for medical expenses from combat wounds received, or help pay for their flight home so they can leave the war zone," said Grey.